This article first appeared in the March 2003 issue of Monitoring Times.

APCO P-25 Family Traits

As more and more users become familiar with the new Uniden APCO Project 25 digital scanners, a number of questions have arisen regarding what kind of systems they should be able to monitor and what kind of performance they should expect.

Project 25 is a suite of standards spanning more than 30 documents, specifying in detail how each piece of radio equipment should operate. Such a thorough and complete set of standards makes it much easier for different departments and agencies to work together (planners use the term interoperate) and allows radio system owners to purchase equipment from competing vendors with some confidence that everything will work together properly.

The core of P-25 revolves around a standard called the Common Air Interface (CAI). The CAI specifies the layout and meaning of each digital message that is sent and received by a radio. The Phase I CAI has a number of requirements, the most relevant of which to a scanner listener is the use of the Improved Multi-Band Excitation (IMBE) voice encoder-decoder (vocoder) to carry voice signals digitally. (Phase II is a future standard that will operation in narrow 6.25 kHz channels.)

Some standards in the P-25 suite are mandatory, but many are not. Radio system owners may pick and choose from the optional standards, depending on what features they want to offer their users, their budget, and the product choices from the equipment vendors. The P-25 standard for trunking, for instance, is optional.

So, in any system you might run into, there are a number of possibilities.

Voice Traffic

Voice traffic on the system may be all analog, all digital, or a mixture of both. Analog traffic can be heard with any scanner that can tune to the proper frequency. Digital traffic used to be completely out of reach, but now with the new Uniden scanners listeners can hear unencrypted IMBE voice traffic carried on systems that use the P-25 CAI.

There are other digital voice systems in operation, most notably older Motorola systems using a proprietary vocoder called VSELP (Vector-Sum-Excited Linear Prediction) and newer EDACS installations using Pro-Voice and AEGIS. The new Uniden scanners will not decode the audio from such systems. EDACS Pro-Voice systems happen to use the IMBE vocoder but the transmission formats are not compatible with the P-25 IMBE implementation.

Trunking Formats

A radio system will either be conventional or trunked. If it is conventional, then the traffic on any particular radio frequency will always be from the same group of radio users. In other words, specific frequencies will be assigned to specific users in a conventional system. The Los Angeles, California, Police Department (LAPD) uses a P-25 system in conventional mode, meaning they do not have any trunking at all.

If a system with P-25 digital audio is trunked, it will almost always use one of two formats. The first format is the actual P-25 standard for trunking, which uses a 9600-baud control channel. These are common on the "pure P-25" systems, like the state of Michigan. The second format is a proprietary Motorola protocol running at 3600 baud, which is typically found on systems that have a mix of analog and digital radios. These control channels are dedicated to carrying trunking messages and do not carry and voice traffic.

Part of the confusion about this point may stem from the fact that Motorola uses the marketing term "ASTRO" for all of their digital products, regardless of the actual type of voice coding and trunking method.

Scanner Success

Below are three tables that indicate which types of systems a listener will be able to monitor with a particular type of scanner. The column going down the left side indicates the types of voice traffic and the rows across specify the type of control channel. A "pure P-25" system, for example, uses P-25 IMBE voice and the P-25 9600 baud control channel, so the scanner results will be in the lower right-hand corner. A Motorola Type 1 system has analog only audio and a 3600-baud control channel, so results on that kind of system would be found in the top row, center column.

The first table indicates that a non-trunking scanner, as long as it can tune to the proper frequency, will be able to monitor the audio only from analog sources. Even if a system uses trunking, a non-trunking scanner will be able to pick up the audio on a particular frequency -- but it may be difficult to follow the action since the scanner will not automatically retune during a trunked conversation. However, on lightly loaded trunked systems or during relatively quiet periods this method can work fairly well. I've found that even a ten-year-old Bearcat BC200XLT is useful in such situations.

Table 1: Success with an analog non-trunk-tracking scanner
 

None

Motorola 3600 baud

P-25 9600 baud

Analog only

Yes

Audio only

N/A

Analog and

ASTRO VSELP digital

Yes for analog

No for VSELP

Audio only for analog

(no tracking)

No for VSELP

N/A

Analog and

P-25 IMBE digital

Yes for analog

No for IMBE

Audio only for analog

(no tracking)

No for IMBE

Audio only for analog

(no tracking)

No for IMBE

ASTRO VSELP digital

No

No

N/A

P-25 IMBE digital

No

No

No

The second table shows that with a trunk-tracking scanner like the Bearcat BC245XLT or Radio Shack PRO-92, the results are identical to the non-trunking scanner except that systems with a 3600-baud control channel are now automatically followed.

Table 2: Success with an analog trunk-tracking scanner
 

None

Motorola 3600 baud

P-25 9600 baud

Analog only

Yes

Yes

N/A

Analog and

ASTRO VSELP digital

Yes for analog

No for VSELP

Yes for analog

No for VSELP

N/A

Analog and

P-25 IMBE digital

Yes for analog

No for IMBE

Yes for analog

No for IMBE

Audio only for analog

(no tracking)

No for IMBE

ASTRO VSELP digital

No

No

N/A

P-25 IMBE digital

No

No

No

The third table shows the results for a digital scanner like the Uniden BC250D or 785D with the BCi25D APCO-25 card. Now the listener will have all the benefits of an analog trunk-tracking scanner, plus can hear any (unencrypted) P-25 IMBE traffic, regardless of which trunking method, if any, is in use.

Table 3: Success with a digital APCO-25 trunk-tracking scanner
 

None

Motorola 3600 baud

P-25 9600 baud

Analog only

Yes

Yes

N/A

Analog and

ASTRO VSELP digital

Yes for analog

No for VSELP

Yes for analog

No for VSELP

N/A

Analog and

P-25 IMBE digital

Yes

Yes

Audio only for analog

Audio only for IMBE

(no tracking)

ASTRO VSELP digital

No

No

N/A

P-25 IMBE digital

Yes

Yes

Audio only

(no tracking)

Many P-25 trunked systems use a 9600-baud control channel, which means that the new Uniden scanners cannot trunk-track those transmissions. However, readers have reported some success in monitoring them in conventional mode.

To monitor 9600-baud systems, it was suggested that Uniden users try programming their scanner with each frequency in the system in descending order. Each frequency should be entered as conventional mode with delay off. Be sure to lock out the control channel. Scanning 9600-baud systems in conventional mode has been done with a fair amount of success, although it can get confusing during busy periods.

State of Florida

A reader who wishes to remain anonymous writes in to let us know about the future plans for the Florida statewide trunked radio system.

Hi Dan,

I have been reading your APCO-25 systems guide in the December/January issues of Monitoring Times. I have one correction for you.

The new State of Florida system will be EDACS utilizing ProVoice-DES encryption, not APCO-25 trunking. During the set-up period, they are using conventional APCO-25 digital audio. But this will not be the final format used.

The new system will incorporate several new features:

First, it will be using the new 3rd generation ProVoice (IMBE) digital voice format, encrypted in DES (FIPS 140-1 Level-1). (Voice Guard was first generation. AEGIS was second generation.)

Second, it will new EDACS Security Key (ESK), which will encrypt the Control Channel data. This will prevent unauthorized radios on the system, and will prevent the newer EDACS Trunk Tracking scanners from following even any analog voice traffic that might appear on the system. The control channel is encrypted, so the scanner cannot follow it.

I thought you might be interested.

For some more background on the EDACS Security Key please see the Tracking the Trunks column from April 2002.

Riverside County, California

Eric from Riverside, California, sent in his notes on the Riverside Sheriff's Department, including frequencies and a description of the different call signs. From his notes:

The Sheriff's Department for the western end of the county added new Mobile Data Terminals (MDTs) to the patrol units. They had to add five more frequencies. They use an Ericcson system with the following frequencies:

  1. 866.2125
  2. 866.2625
  3. 866.7125
  4. 866.7625
  5. 867.2125
  6. 867.7125
  7. 868.2125
  8. 867.2625
  9. 868.2625
  10. 868.7125
  11. 867.7875
  12. 868.7876

Unit Equipment

Civil = serving court papers (evictions, no trespassing, etc)

CP = citizen patrol

George = city of Norco

RC = transportation of prisoners

Star 80 or 81 = air unit helicopter only

Zebra = auto theft

Edward Units

Edward = Riverside Sheriff's Department, shifts 1, 2 and 3

1, 2, 3 Edward 11 to19 Rubidoux Highland area (Beat 1)

1, 2, 3 Edward 20 to 29 Mira Loma - Pedley area (Beat 2)

1, 2, 3 Edward 30 to 31 El Cerrito Eastvale area (Beat 3)

5 Edward 410 to 419 CAT (Community Action Team), Rubidoux Highland area
5 Edward 420 to 429 CAT team, Mira Loma - Pedley area

5 Edward 430 to 449 CAT team, El Cerrito Eastvale

5 Edward 450 to 460 School Resource Officer

Edward 110 to 200 Supervision or Lead Officer

Edward 20 to 30 Lieutenants

Edward 1 to 20 Captains or higher

 

Talkgroups

  1. Riverside Main Dispatch
  2. Channel 2 Car to Car
  3. Channel 3 Alternate Dispatch
  4. Channel 4
  5. Channel 5
  1. Moreno Valley, Contract city
  2. Moreno Valley, Car to Car, channel 7
  3. Moreno Valley, Alternate, channel 8
  4. Moreno Valley, Channel 9
  5. Moreno Valley, Channel 10
  1. Wants/Warrants, West End Channel 12
  1. Detectives, West End, Channel 15
  1. District Attorney, West End, Channel 19
  1. Coroner, West End, Channel 22
  1. Riverside Police Phone Patch, Channel 32

 

That's all for this month. I welcome updates, corrections and additional information via electronic mail at dan @ signalharbor.com. There is further information, frequencies and links on my web site at www.signalharbor.com. Until next month, happy monitoring!


Comments to Dan Veeneman

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